Gavin Rodgers

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Exclusive - pic shows: Frank Gardner BBC presenter disabled in terrorist shooting tries out a new "segway wheelchair".<br />
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It's called a Genny and costs £13,500 and does 14km/hour<br />
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"Look, mum, no hands" Gardner gets to grips with the balance of the device that was developed in partnership with Segway.<br />
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It allows the new style wheelchair to turn on a sixpence without the need for using controls.  <br />
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Frank was spotted testing the machine on the forecourt of the BBC HQ in London. He seemed a bit nervous at first with the idea that the two wheeler would balance itself.<br />
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"I'm just giving it a test run. It feels great but I'm still getting used to the idea.<br />
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"It certainly feels like it would be a lot of fun once you get the hang of it. I believe they do an off-road version as well which I would like to try.<br />
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"It feels strange that you can take you hands away and you fear that you will fall forwards of backwards. But off course you don't because of the gyroscope keeps you upright."<br />
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Segway  have been around for years and it seems an obvious idea to incorporate the technology to a wheelchair. Why has no-one done this before?<br />
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"These new electric hover boards are cropping up everywhere nowadays. People using them on the pavements is technically illegal.<br />
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"But this device gets a special dispensation as it is a mobility device."<br />
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Due to the elimination of the small wheels it is also much better on soft or rough terrain such as snow, gravel, sand or grass.<br />
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Also according to the website it allows  you to hold hand with your nearest and dearest.<br />
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Pic by Gavin Rodgers/Pixel 8000 Ltd
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